Cardioprotection through a PKC-dependent decrease in myofilament ATPase.

@article{Pyle2003CardioprotectionTA,
  title={Cardioprotection through a PKC-dependent decrease in myofilament ATPase.},
  author={W. Glen Pyle and Yi Chen and Polly A. Hofmann},
  journal={American journal of physiology. Heart and circulatory physiology},
  year={2003},
  volume={285 3},
  pages={
          H1220-8
        }
}
  • W. PyleYi ChenP. Hofmann
  • Published 1 September 2003
  • Biology
  • American journal of physiology. Heart and circulatory physiology
Activation of myocardial kappa-opioid receptor-protein kinase C (PKC) pathways may improve postischemic contractile function through a myofilament reduction in ATP utilization. To test this, we first examined the effects of PKC inhibitors on kappa-opioid receptor-dependent cardioprotection. The kappa-opioid receptor agonist U50,488H (U50) increased postischemic left ventricular developed pressure and reduced postischemic end-diastolic pressure compared with controls. PKC inhibitors abolished… 

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