Cardiac rhythm and conduction before and after Mustard's operation for complete transposition of the great arteries.

@article{Southall1980CardiacRA,
  title={Cardiac rhythm and conduction before and after Mustard's operation for complete transposition of the great arteries.},
  author={David P. Southall and Barry R. Keeton and Ranjit Leanage and Leslie Lam and M. C. Joseph and R. H. Anderson and Christopher Lincoln and Elliot A. Shinebourne},
  journal={British Heart Journal},
  year={1980},
  volume={43},
  pages={21 - 30}
}
Between 1973 and 1978, 120 patients with transposition ofthe great arteries had a modification of Mustard's operation designed to avoid damage to the sinus and atrioventricular nodes. Of these, 88 had an atrial baffle alone from which nine hospital and four late deaths occurred (total mortality 14.8%); 32 had additional closure of ventricular septal defect and/or relief of left ventricular outflow tract obstruction from which six hospital and three late deaths occurred (28%). On the standard… Expand
Cardiac conduction abnormalities and rhythm changes after neonatal anatomical correction of transposition of the great arteries.
TLDR
The frequency of important cardiac arrhythmias after neonatal anatomical correction of transposition of the great arteries was 5%, significantly less than that reported after atrial inflow diversion for the same malformation. Expand
Arrhythmias after the Mustard operation for transposition of the great arteries: a long-term study.
TLDR
It was observed that the slow atrial or junctional rhythms that appeared after intraatrial correction of transposition of the great arteries rarely progressed to life-threatening rhythm disorders in childhood or adolescence, but the prognosis in adult life remains unknown. Expand
Arrhythmia and late mortality after Mustard and Senning operation for transposition of the great arteries. An eight-year prospective study.
TLDR
Loss of sinus rhythm or the presence of arrhythmia on standard electrocardiograms or Holter recordings did not identify patients at risk for increased morbidity or mortality, even with current surgical techniques. Expand
Arrhythmias in transposition of the great arteries after the Mustard operation.
TLDR
Intracardiac electrophysiologic evaluation of 87 survivors of the Mustard operation showed a high frequency of abnormal sinus node recovery times and suboptimal response of the atrioventricular-conduction system to rapid atrial pacing. Expand
Arrhythmias before and after anatomic correction of transposition of the great arteries.
Cardiac rhythm has been evaluated using 24 hour ambulatory electrocardiographic (ECG) recordings in 92 survivors of anatomic correction of transposition of the great arteries. A low incidence ofExpand
Cardiac rhythm after the Mustard operation for complete transposition of the great arteries.
TLDR
It is demonstrated that extended survival among patients with transposition can be expected after the Mustard operation, however, over time there is a decreasing prevalence of normal sinus rhythm in survivors, as well as a small risk of sudden death. Expand
The asymptomatic child a long time after the Mustard operation for transposition of the great arteries.
TLDR
It is concluded that the absence of symptoms and a normal routine examination of children a long time after a Mustard operation does not exclude hemodynamic and electrophysiological abnormalities, which can sometimes be severe. Expand
Cardiac rhythm and conduction before and after anatomic correction of transposition of the great arteries.
TLDR
Except for 1 patient with atrioventricular dissociation believed to be secondary to a preventable cause, 34 patients followed for 890 patient-months after anatomic correction for transposition of the great arteries had no significant arrhythmias. Expand
Cardiac rhythm after Mustard repair and after arterial switch operation for complete transposition.
TLDR
Holter monitoring did not detect bradyarrhythmias indicating sinus node dysfunction in a single patient after the arterial switch, but did so to a similar extent in both groups having the Mustard procedure. Expand
Long‐term Results After Atrial Repair of Transposition of the Great Arteries in Early Infancy
TLDR
It is concluded that atrial repair of d‐TGA in early infancy can be performed with a low mortality rate and a low incidence of late complications. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 27 REFERENCES
Late Dysrhythmias and Disturbances of Conduction following Mustard Operation for Complete Transposition of the Great Arteries
TLDR
Electrocardiograms of 47 patients discharged from hospital following atrial baffle repair for transposition of the great arteries found that the 'sinus' rhythm seen after operation originates in the sinoatrial node but the rhythm is functionally similar. Expand
Mustard's operation modified to avoid dysrhythmias and pulmonary and systemic venous obstruction.
TLDR
Operative technique, in particular, wide excision of the septum secundum and baffle design as suggested by Brom, have reduced the incidence of superior and inferior caval obstruction and pulmonary venous obstruction. Expand
Electrophysiological abnormalities after Mustard's operation for transposition of the great arteries.
TLDR
The abnormal pacemaker recovery time and the absence of conduction disturbances in the atria, atrioventricular node, and His-Purkinje system confirm the hypothesis that injury to the sinoatrial node is the main cause of dysrhythmias after Mustard's operation. Expand
Electrophysiologic studies after mustard's operation for d-transposition of the great vessels.
TLDR
It is indicated that a diseased sinus node and interrupted atrial pathways are involved in the genesis of arrhythmias after Mustard's operation, and that adequate evaluation of arrHythmias in patients after this operation requires not only the standard electrocardiogram, but also a 24 hour Holter monitor, His bundle electrograms and determination of sinus nodal recovery time and atrial and A-V nodal effective refractory periods. Expand
Total correction of transposition of the great arteries. Conduction disturbances in infants younger than three months of age.
TLDR
Three factors--age, mode of cardiopulmonary support, and complexity of the lesion--influenced these results. Expand
Protection of the Sinus Node in Mustard's Operation
TLDR
A significant decrease in the incidence of dysrhythmias occurred in the group of patients operated upon after the surgical modifications, and the modifications in surgical technique have reduced but not avoided dysrh rhythmias. Expand
Apparent interruption of atrial conduction pathways after surgical repair of transposition of great arteries.
TLDR
The results indicate that extensive disturbance of the atrial septal connections between the sinus and atrioventricular nodes frequently is associated with serious dysrhythmias and disruption of the region of the middle atrial conduction pathway is frequently associated with dysrhythmia. Expand
Correction of the Transposition of the Great Arteries
TLDR
Inversion of the atrial flow in transposition of the great arteries is achieved in the following way: the remaining atrial septum is detached from behind, leaving it as a flap between both AVs, and the atrian septal flap is reattached in front of the caval vein orifices. Expand
Study of cardiac arrhythmias and other forms of conduction abnormality in newborn infants.
TLDR
Investigation by means of 24-hour ECG monitoring showed that apparently serious tachyarrhythmias, such as ventricular tachycardia and slow heart rates associated with sinoatrial block, may be present without clinical disturbance in some newborn babies. Expand
A new look at the neonatal electrocardiogram.
TLDR
Among 818 newborn babies whose electrocardiograms were recorded between April 1975 and April 1976 were 57 babies with recordings that fell outside the accepted normal range, which may indicate a link between conducting tissue abnormalities and the sudden infant death syndrome. Expand
...
1
2
3
...