Cardiac Glycosides and Thyroidal Iodide Transport

@article{Wolff1958CardiacGA,
  title={Cardiac Glycosides and Thyroidal Iodide Transport},
  author={John B. Wolff and John R. Maurey},
  journal={Nature},
  year={1958},
  volume={182},
  pages={957-957}
}
DURING the past few years, it has become apparent that an important action of the cardiac glycosides involves the transport of potassium ions into the cell. It has also become possible, by the use of potassium-depleted erythrocytes, to test the relative inhibitory potency of such glycosides or their aglycones in vitro1,2. Approximately 80 per cent of the potassium influx can be inhibited by the glycoside by an action that appears to involve competition by drug and potassium ions for the active… 

Autoregulation of thyroid iodide transport: possible mediation by modification in sodium cotransport.

Kinetic analysis revealed that the inhibition of iodide-concentrating activity by iodide pretreatment was accompanied by a reduction in the apparent affinity of the iodide transport for iodide as reflected by increase in the value of KA, the concentration of iodides required to achieve half-maximal transport activity.

Perchlorate and the thyroid gland.

  • J. Wolff
  • Medicine, Biology
    Pharmacological reviews
  • 1998
Lower dosages and shorter treatment periods appear to have prevented such reactions in its recent reintroduction, mostly for amiodarone-induced thyroid dysfunction and combined therapy of perchlorate and thionamides is recommended for the more severe cases of thyrotoxicosis.

Stimulatory effect of ammonium ion on iodide trapping in isolated thyroid cells.

  • G. BurkeK. Kowalski
  • Biology
    Life sciences. Pt. 2: Biochemistry, general and molecular biology
  • 1971

Thyroidal K + -activated p-nitrophenylphosphatase activity.

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The present study of the kinetics of the inhibition of K transport in glycosidepoisoned human red cells has been undertaken in an effort to throw more light on the detailed mechanism by which K

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