Carcinoma of the Anal Canal

@article{Myerson1995CarcinomaOT,
  title={Carcinoma of the Anal Canal},
  author={Robert J. Myerson and Stephen J. Shapiro and D. L. Lacey and M. L{\'o}pez and Elisa H. Birnbaum and James W. Fleshman and Robert D. Fry and Ira J. Kodner},
  journal={American Journal of Clinical Oncology},
  year={1995},
  volume={18},
  pages={32–39}
}
From 1975 to 1990 65 patients with carcinoma of the anal canal received radiation therapy alone or in conjunction with other modalities. Follow-up ranged from 12 to 171 months (mean: 59 months; median: 44 months). Actuarial disease-free survival (including salvage surgery) for T1–3 NO lesions was 88% ± 7% at 10 years. This was independent of T stage (91% for T1, 88% for T2, and 100% for T3). Disease-free survival was significantly worse for Tl-3 N+ lesions (52% ± 23% disease-free at 10 years, P… Expand
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TLDR
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