Carbonyl sulfide and carbon disulfide: Large‐scale distributions over the western Pacific and emissions from Asia during TRACE‐P

@article{Blake2004CarbonylSA,
  title={Carbonyl sulfide and carbon disulfide: Large‐scale distributions over the western Pacific and emissions from Asia during TRACE‐P},
  author={Nicola J. Blake and David G. Streets and Jung-Hun Woo and Isobel J. Simpson and Jonathan Green and Simone Meinardi and Kazuyuki Kita and Elliot L. Atlas and Henry E. Fuelberg and G. W. Sachse and Melody Avery and Stephanie A. Vay and Robert W. Talbot and Jack E. Dibb and Alan R. Bandy and Donald C. Thornton and F. Sherwood Rowland and Donald Ray Blake},
  journal={Journal of Geophysical Research},
  year={2004},
  volume={109}
}
[1] An extensive set of carbonyl sulfide (OCS) and carbon disulfide (CS2) observations were made as part of the NASA Transport and Chemical Evolution over the Pacific (TRACE-P) project, which took place in the early spring 2001. TRACE-P sampling focused on the western Pacific region but in total included the geographic region 110°E to 290°E longitude, 5°N to 50°N latitude, and 0–12 km altitude. Substantial OCS and CS2 enhancements were observed for a great many air masses of Chinese and… 

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