Carbon monoxide intoxication: An updated review

@article{Prockop2007CarbonMI,
  title={Carbon monoxide intoxication: An updated review},
  author={Leon D. Prockop and Rossitza I. Chichkova},
  journal={Journal of the Neurological Sciences},
  year={2007},
  volume={262},
  pages={122-130}
}
Carbon monoxide (CO), a highly toxic gas produced by incomplete combustion of hydrocarbons, is a relatively common cause of human injury. Human toxicity is often overlooked because CO is tasteless and odorless and its clinical symptoms and signs are non specific. The brain and the heart may be severely affected after CO exposure with carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) levels exceeding 20%. Damage occurs because the affinity of hemoglobin for CO is 210 times higher than for O(2). Hypoxic brain damage… 
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