Carbon dioxide fixation by cells of Streptococcus faecalis var. liquefaciens.

Abstract

Fixation of NaH(14)CO(3) by a heavy cell suspension of Streptococcus faecalis var. liquefaciens was studied. Several nutrients, pyridoxal, riboflavine, adenine, uracil, and O(2) stimulated (14)CO(2) incorporation into cells only under conditions that were adequate for synthesis of cell macromolecules. Biotin increased CO(2) incorporation in the absence of extensive synthesis of macromolecules, whereas O(2) inhibited incorporation under these conditions. When (14)CO(2) fixation was occurring during synthesis of macromolecules, 71% of the (14)C was incorporated into cells and 29% occurred extracellularly. Ninety-three per cent of the cellular (14)C was in protein and 5.5% was in nucleic acid. Aspartic acid was the only amino acid in the protein fraction that was radioactive. Eighty-three per cent of the extracellular (14)C was resistant to precipitation by trichloroacetic acid. When (14)CO(2) fixation was occurring in cells that were not carrying on extensive synthesis of macromolecules, 38% of the (14)C was incorporated into cells and 59% occurred in the supernatant fluid. Sixty-nine per cent of the cellular (14)C was in protein, 21% was in low-molecular-weight compounds, and 9% was in nucleic acid. Addition of unlabeled aspartate to the medium inhibited incorporation of (14)CO(2). Based on studies of the rate of (14)CO(2) fixation, the cells fix CO(2) into a pool of intermediates which are either used for synthesis, primarily protein, or are excreted into the medium.

Cite this paper

@article{Goff1970CarbonDF, title={Carbon dioxide fixation by cells of Streptococcus faecalis var. liquefaciens.}, author={Raal Goff and R E Hartman}, journal={Journal of bacteriology}, year={1970}, volume={104 1}, pages={27-33} }