Carbon Monoxide and Cyanide Poisoning in the Burned Pregnant Patient: An Indication for Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy

@article{Culnan2018CarbonMA,
  title={Carbon Monoxide and Cyanide Poisoning in the Burned Pregnant Patient: An Indication for Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy},
  author={Derek M. Culnan and Beretta Craft-Coffman and Genevieve H. Bitz and Karel Capek and Yiji Tu and William C. Lineaweaver and Maggie Kuhlmann-Capek},
  journal={Annals of Plastic Surgery},
  year={2018},
  volume={80},
  pages={S106–S112}
}
Abstract Carbon monoxide (CO) is a small molecule poison released as a product of incomplete combustion. Carbon monoxide binds hemoglobin, reducing oxygen delivery. This effect is exacerbated in the burned pregnant patient by fetal hemoglobin that binds CO 2.5- to 3-fold stronger than maternal hemoglobin. With no signature clinical symptom, diagnosis depends on patient injury history, elevated carboxyhemoglobin levels, and alterations in mental status. The standard of care for treatment of CO… 

The Diagnosis and Treatment of Carbon Monoxide Poisoning.

High-quality, prospective, randomized trials that would enable a definitive judgment of the efficacy of HBOT are currently lacking, and there is no general recommendation for HBOT.

S2k guideline diagnosis and treatment of carbon monoxide poisoning

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Open issues in management of carbon monoxide poisoning in pregnancy: practical suggestions

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  • Medicine
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Some practical suggestions for organizations wishing to develop their own protocols forHyperbaric oxygen therapy in pregnancy is proven to be safe and it is considered to be beneficial, reducing the severity of the fetal injuries.

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Carbon Monoxide Toxicity.

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This study provides useful information to the doctor who comes first to the site of intoxication to reduce diagnostic and therapeutic errors in the pre- and intra-hospital phase as much as possible.

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