Carbon Dioxide Enrichment Inhibits Nitrate Assimilation in Wheat and Arabidopsis

@article{Bloom2010CarbonDE,
  title={Carbon Dioxide Enrichment Inhibits Nitrate Assimilation in Wheat and Arabidopsis},
  author={Arnold J Bloom and Martin Burger and Jose Salvador Rubaio Asensio and Asaph B. Cousins},
  journal={Science},
  year={2010},
  volume={328},
  pages={899 - 903}
}
Nitrate for Me, Ammonium for You The interdependence of plant nitrogen uptake and plant responses to carbon dioxide is well established, but the influence of inorganic nitrogen form—i.e., whether nitrate or ammonium—has been largely ignored. Bloom et al. (p. 899) present evidence from five independent methods in both a monocot and dicot species that carbon dioxide inhibition of nitrate assimilation is a major determinant of plant responses to rising atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide… Expand
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