Capuchin monkey tool use: Overview and implications

@article{Ottoni2008CapuchinMT,
  title={Capuchin monkey tool use: Overview and implications},
  author={Eduardo B. Ottoni and Patr{\'i}cia Izar},
  journal={Evolutionary Anthropology: Issues},
  year={2008},
  volume={17}
}
Nutcracking capuchins are mentioned in reports dating as far back as the sixteenth century, 1 , 2 as well as in Brazilian folklore. 3 However, it was barely a decade ago that primatologists “discovered” the spontaneous use of stones to crack nuts in a semi‐free ranging group of tufted capuchin monkeys. Since then, we have found several more capuchin populations in savanna‐like environments which employ this form of tool use. 5–7 The evidence so far only weakly supports genetically based… Expand
TOOL USE TRADITIONS IN NONHUMAN PRIMATES: THE CASE OF TUFTED CAPUCHIN MONKEYS
Tool use was once a major defining feature of "human nature". If the findings about the spontaneous use of tools by wild chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) forced us to rethink traditional views on theExpand
Sexual bias in probe tool manufacture and use by wild bearded capuchin monkeys
TLDR
Examination of data from a two-year research on the use of sticks as probes by two groups of wild capuchin monkeys (Sapajus libidinosus) in Serra da Capivara National Park, Brazil finds a strong male bias in the occurrence of probe tool use. Expand
Social learning strategies for nut-cracking by tufted capuchin monkeys (Sapajus spp.)
TLDR
It is argued that the dissemination of the behavior has been followed almost from its beginning, to a more common pattern where adults are the most active tool users (Tradition Phase), based on changes of the demographic patterns of tool use and observation. Expand
Did Monkeys Make the Pre-Clovis Pebble Tools of Northeastern Brazil?
ABSTRACT Brazilian capuchin monkeys use pebbles as tools for diverse tasks and thus unintentionally create flakes resembling those made by ancient hominins. Capuchins have been using tools in theExpand
Tufted capuchin monkeys (Sapajus sp) learning how to crack nuts: Does variability decline throughout development?
TLDR
The process of nut-cracking acquisition in a semi-free population of tufted capuchin monkeys in São Paulo, Brazil is investigated and it is found that variability of actions related to cracking declined. Expand
Wild Capuchins Show Male-Biased Feeding Tool Use
TLDR
It is suggested that sex differences in tool use may function as opportunities for male signaling of investment quality in bearded capuchins living in the dry Caatinga forests of the Serra da Capivara National Park, Piaui, Brazil. Expand
Wild Bearded Capuchin Monkeys (Sapajus libidinosus) Strategically Place Nuts in a Stable Position during Nut-Cracking
TLDR
It is discovered that bearded capuchin monkeys deliberately place palm nuts in a relatively stable position on the anvil before striking them, and skilled placement depends upon information generated by manual action. Expand
Stone tool use by adult wild bearded capuchin monkeys (Cebus libidinosus). Frequency, efficiency and tool selectivity.
TLDR
It is argued that the contrasting pattern of sex differences in capuchins compared with chimpanzees, in which females use tools more frequently and more skillfully than males, may have arisen from the degree of sexual dimorphism in body size of the two species, which is larger in capuchin monkeys than in chimpanzees. Expand
Cashew Nut Positioning during Stone Tool Use by Wild Bearded Capuchin Monkeys (Sapajus libidinosus)
TLDR
Wild capuchin monkeys at Serra da Capivara National Park, Brazil, regularly use stone tools to break open cashew nuts, and this relatively rare behaviour appears to have a complex ontogeny, but further studies are required to establish the extent to which social learning is involved. Expand
Is primate tool use special? Chimpanzee and New Caledonian crow compared
  • W. McGrew
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
  • 2013
The chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) is well-known in both nature and captivity as an impressive maker and user of tools, but recently the New Caledonian crow (Corvus moneduloides) has been championed asExpand
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TLDR
On three occasions, the monkeys used smaller stones to loosen bigger quartz pebbles embedded in conglomerate rock, which were subsequently used as tools, which could be considered the first reports of secondary tool use by wild capuchin monkeys. Expand
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