Capuchin cognitive ecology: cooperation based on projected returns

@article{Waal2003CapuchinCE,
  title={Capuchin cognitive ecology: cooperation based on projected returns},
  author={Frans B.M. de Waal and Jason M. Davis},
  journal={Neuropsychologia},
  year={2003},
  volume={41},
  pages={221-228}
}

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