Capuchin Stone Tool Use in Caatinga Dry Forest

@article{DeAMoura2004CapuchinST,
  title={Capuchin Stone Tool Use in Caatinga Dry Forest},
  author={Antonio Christian De A. Moura and P. C. Lee},
  journal={Science},
  year={2004},
  volume={306},
  pages={1909 - 1909}
}
Wild capuchin monkeys inhabiting dry forest were found to customarily use tools as part of their extractive foraging techniques. Tools consisted of twigs and sticks, often modified, which were used to probe for insects and, most frequently, of stones of a variety of sizes and shapes used for cracking and digging. The use of tools for digging has been thought to be restricted to humans. These monkeys, living in a harsh dry habitat, survive food limitation and foraging time constraints through… 
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