Capgras delusion: a window on face recognition

@article{Ellis2001CapgrasDA,
  title={Capgras delusion: a window on face recognition},
  author={H. Ellis and M. Lewis},
  journal={Trends in Cognitive Sciences},
  year={2001},
  volume={5},
  pages={149-156}
}
  • H. Ellis, M. Lewis
  • Published 2001
  • Medicine, Psychology
  • Trends in Cognitive Sciences
Capgras delusion is the belief that significant others have been replaced by impostors, robots or aliens. Although it usually occurs within a psychiatric illness, it can also be the result of brain injury or other obviously organic disorder. In contrast to patients with prosopagnosia, who cannot consciously recognize previously familiar faces but display autonomic or covert recognition (measured by skin conductance responses), people with Capgras delusion do not show differential autonomic… Expand
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The findings of this case study suggest that the first factor in Capgras delusion may be reduced neural activity in the extended face processing system that deals with inference of mental states while the second factor may be due to a lesion in the right middle frontal gyrus. Expand
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  • Psychology, Medicine
  • International journal of psychophysiology : official journal of the International Organization of Psychophysiology
  • 2007
TLDR
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TLDR
In the light of current neural models of face perception, patients with Capgras syndrome may be related to impaired recognition of a familiar face, subserved by the posterior cingulate/precuneus cortex, and impaired reflection about personally relevant knowledge related to a face, subserved by the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex. Expand
In what sense ‘familiar’? Examining experiential differences within pathologies of facial recognition
  • G. Young
  • Medicine, Psychology
  • Consciousness and Cognition
  • 2009
TLDR
The paper concludes that the experiential states of Capgras delusion, prosopagnosia, and related facial pathologies are quite distinct, and that this descriptive distinctiveness finds explanatory equivalence at the level of anatomical and functional disruption within the face recognition system. Expand
“Far from the heart far from the eye”: Evidence from the Capgras delusion
TLDR
Eye region exploration seems to be related to the autonomic reactivity elicited by the affective valence of familiar faces in patients with Capgras syndrome. Expand
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TLDR
This case supports the "two-hit hypothesis" about Capgras delusion etiopathogenesis: here, the first hit is represented by the right-temporal lesion impairing the association between familiar faces and emotional values, the second one is the frontal bilateral hypometabolism favoring delusional behavior. Expand
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