Cannibalism in the Madagascan dinosaur Majungatholus atopus

@article{Rogers2003CannibalismIT,
  title={Cannibalism in the Madagascan dinosaur Majungatholus atopus},
  author={Raymond R. Rogers and David W. Krause and Kristina A. Curry Rogers},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2003},
  volume={422},
  pages={515-518}
}
Many lines of evidence have been brought to bear on the question of theropod feeding ecology, including functional and physiological considerations, morphological constraints, taphonomic associations, and telling—although rare—indications of direct ingestion. Tooth marks of theropods, although rarely described and generally left unassigned to a particular taxon, can provide unique clues into predator–prey interaction, and can also yield insights into the extent of carcass utilization. Here we… Expand
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Three nearly complete, isolated vertebrae, and a right humerus of a sub-adult hadrosaurine (Ornithopoda: Hadrosaurinae), all from separate individuals and from the Late Cretaceous (late Campanian)Expand
Paleopathology in a nearly complete skeleton of Majungasaurus crenatissimus (Theropoda: Abelisauridae)
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