Cannabis as a substitute for prescription drugs – a cross-sectional study

@article{Corroon2017CannabisAA,
  title={Cannabis as a substitute for prescription drugs – a cross-sectional study},
  author={Jamie Corroon and Laurie K Mischley and M. Sexton},
  journal={Journal of Pain Research},
  year={2017},
  volume={10},
  pages={989 - 998}
}
Background The use of medical cannabis is increasing, most commonly for pain, anxiety and depression. Emerging data suggest that use and abuse of prescription drugs may be decreasing in states where medical cannabis is legal. The aim of this study was to survey cannabis users to determine whether they had intentionally substituted cannabis for prescription drugs. Methods A total of 2,774 individuals were a self-selected convenience sample who reported having used cannabis at least once in the… Expand
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