Cannabinoids for treatment of spasticity and other symptoms related to multiple sclerosis (CAMS study): multicentre randomised placebo-controlled trial

@article{Zajicek2003CannabinoidsFT,
  title={Cannabinoids for treatment of spasticity and other symptoms related to multiple sclerosis (CAMS study): multicentre randomised placebo-controlled trial},
  author={John P. Zajicek and Patrick J Fox and Hilary Sanders and David Wright and Jane Vickery and Andrew J Nunn and Alan Glasper Felicity Thompson},
  journal={The Lancet},
  year={2003},
  volume={362},
  pages={1517-1526}
}
BACKGROUND Multiple sclerosis is associated with muscle stiffness, spasms, pain, and tremor. [...] Key MethodWe did a randomised, placebo-controlled trial, to which we enrolled 667 patients with stable multiple sclerosis and muscle spasticity. 630 participants were treated at 33 UK centres with oral cannabis extract (n=211), Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Delta9-THC; n=206), or placebo (n=213). Trial duration was 15 weeks.Expand
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Evidence is found that combined THC and CBD extracts may provide therapeutic benefit for MS spasticity symptoms and subjective assessment of symptom relief did often show significant improvement post-treatment.
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