Cannabinoid agonists and antagonists modulate lithium-induced conditioned gaping in rats

@article{Parker2003CannabinoidAA,
  title={Cannabinoid agonists and antagonists modulate lithium-induced conditioned gaping in rats},
  author={Linda A. Parker and Raphael Mechoulam},
  journal={Integrative Physiological \& Behavioral Science},
  year={2003},
  volume={38},
  pages={133-145}
}
Considerable evidence indicates that conditioned gaping in rats reflects nausea in this species that does not vomit. A series of experiments evaluated the potential of psychoactive cannabinoid agonists, Δ-9-THC and HU-210, and non-psychoactive cannabinoids, Cannabidiol (CBD) and its dimethylheptyl homolog (CBD-dmh), to interfere with the establishment and the expression of conditioned gaping in rats. All agents attenuated both the establishment and the expression of conditioned gaping… Expand
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The conditioned gaping reaction can be used as a pre-clinical tool to evaluate the side effects of nausea that might result from newly developed pharmaceutical agents. Expand
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Ondansetron and Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol interfere with the establishment of lithium-induced conditioned taste avoidance in the house musk shrew (Suncus murinus).
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Conditioned flavor avoidance and conditioned gaping: rat models of conditioned nausea.
  • L. Parker
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • European journal of pharmacology
  • 2014
TLDR
Conditional gaping reactions are consistently produced by emetic drugs and are prevented by anti-emetic drugs, indicating that they may be a more selective measure of conditioned malaise in rats. Expand
Interaction between non-psychotropic cannabinoids in marihuana: effect of cannabigerol (CBG) on the anti-nausea or anti-emetic effects of cannabidiol (CBD) in rats and shrews
TLDR
Interactions between moderate doses of CBG and CBD may oppose one another at the 5-HT1A receptor in the regulation of nausea and vomiting. Expand
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