Canine and feline obesity: a One Health perspective

@article{Sande2014CanineAF,
  title={Canine and feline obesity: a One Health perspective},
  author={Peter Sand{\o}e and C. Palmer and Sandra A. Corr and Arne Astrup and Charlotte Reinhard Bj{\o}rnvad},
  journal={Veterinary Record},
  year={2014},
  volume={175},
  pages={610 - 616}
}
Recent years have seen a drastic increase in the rates of overweight and obesity among people living in some developed nations. There has also been increased concern over obesity in companion animals. In the latest article in Veterinary Record's series on One Health, Peter Sandøe and colleagues argue that the relationship between obesity in people and in companion animals is closer and more complex than previously thought, and that obesity should be treated as a One Health problem 
Feline obesity and diabetes: a One Health perspective.
  • M. Lewitt
  • Medicine, Biology
    CAB Reviews: Perspectives in Agriculture, Veterinary Science, Nutrition and Natural Resources
  • 2019
TLDR
A closer interdisciplinary ‘One Health’ approach between veterinary and human medicine is warranted to advance research and clinical care in this field of feline obesity and diabetes as models of human disease.
Obesity in Humans and Dogs: Similarities, Links, and Differences
TLDR
Better understanding of this disease would not only help to design obesity treatment approaches, but also to prevent it in humans and dogs taking advantage of marvelous human-dog relationship.
Obesity and Associated Comorbidities in People and Companion Animals: A One Health Perspective.
Other Risks/Possible Benefits of Obesity.
  • L. Weeth
  • Medicine
    The Veterinary clinics of North America. Small animal practice
  • 2016
European dog owner perceptions of obesity and factors associated with human and canine obesity
TLDR
Dog owners who did not consider obesity to be a disease were more likely to have obese dogs, and common factors associated with obesity in owners and their dogs were age, gender and owners’ attitudes to diet and physical activity.
A One Health Perspective on the Human–Companion Animal Relationship with Emphasis on Zoonotic Aspects
TLDR
Evaluation of positive and negative One Health issues of the human–companion animal relationship with a focus on zoonotic aspects of cats and dogs in industrialized countries finds that the changed human–animal relationship with pet animals can totally differ compared to decennia ago.
Overweight in adult cats: a cross-sectional study
TLDR
The prevalence of overweight cats as assessed by trained personnel was high and in the same range as previously reported, and the association with dry food found in adult, neutered cats is potentially important because this type of food is commonly fed to cats worldwide, and warrants further attention.
Neutering increases the risk of obesity in male dogs but not in bitches — A cross-sectional study of dog- and owner-related risk factors for obesity in Danish companion dogs
TLDR
A complex interaction between owners’ weight status, feeding practices and the risk of dogs being overweight or obese was found, which stresses the need to consider companion animal obesity from a One Health perspective in future prospective studies.
Impact of canine overweight and obesity on health-related quality of life
TLDR
It is suggested that overweight and obese dogs have a reduced HRQL in two of the domains compared to non-overweight dogs, and that differences in HRQL are detectable between BCS scores 2, 3, 4 and 5.
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