Candidemia in a tertiary care hospital: epidemiology, risk factors, and predictors of mortality.

@article{Fraser1992CandidemiaIA,
  title={Candidemia in a tertiary care hospital: epidemiology, risk factors, and predictors of mortality.},
  author={V. Fraser and M. Jones and J. Dunkel and S. Storfer and G. Medoff and W. C. Dunagan},
  journal={Clinical infectious diseases : an official publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America},
  year={1992},
  volume={15 3},
  pages={
          414-21
        }
}
  • V. Fraser, M. Jones, +3 authors W. C. Dunagan
  • Published 1992
  • Medicine
  • Clinical infectious diseases : an official publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America
Demographic information, risk factors, therapy, and outcome for all patients who had candidemia at Barnes Hospital, St. Louis, between 1 September 1988 and 1 September 1989 were retrospectively reviewed. One hundred six candidemic patients were identified, representing 0.5% of all medical and surgical discharges and 0.33% of total patient discharges. These percentages represent a 20-fold increase in the incidence of candidemia at our hospital in comparison with that during 1976-1979. Candida… Expand
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Candidemia in a pediatric population.
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  • Medicine
  • Clinical infectious diseases : an official publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America
  • 1995
TLDR
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Epidemiology, Species Distribution, Antifungal Susceptibility and Outcome of Nosocomial Candidemia in a Tertiary Care Hospital in Italy
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It is shown that candidemia is a significant source of morbidity in Italy, with a substantial burden of disease, mortality, and likely high associated costs. Expand
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Analysis showed that administration of vancomycin promoted proliferation of Candida organisms in the gastrointestinal tract and that this proliferation was associated with an increased risk of candidemia. Expand
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Candida bloodstream infections represented 10% of all nosocomial bloodstream infections in the period studied at the University Hospital; they are associated with a significant medical and economic burden well above that expected of the underlying diseases alone. Expand
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It remains to be shown in controlled clinical trials whether limiting the number of antibiotics or instituting prophylaxis and/or early treatment for high-risk patients will reduce the incidence of nosocomial candidemia. Expand
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This report reviews 48 episodes of hospital-acquired fungemia that occurred over a four-year period at a large community teaching hospital and found that hospitalization on the medical service, age greater than 60 years, and hospital stay less than 100 days were associated with a significantly increased mortality rate. Expand
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Overall mortality was 59%, candidemia directly contributing to death in 75% of cases and failure to initiate therapy with amphotericin B had a negative influence on outcome, whereas analysis of the entire group identified severity of underlying illness as the dominant cofactor influencing outcome. Expand
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The data suggested that fungemia of a duration of greater than 72 hours, evidence of endophthalmitis or critically ill clinical status were all reasons for instituting amphotericin B therapy. Expand
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Two hundred thirty-five fungal infections occurred in patients with malignant diseases over a four-year period and were due to Candida species and Torulopsis glabrata and are reviewed herein. Expand
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It is suggested that candidemia in most patients represents a failure of host defense, and that septicemia of either bacteria or fungi may arise from the gastrointestinal tract in critically ill, immunocompromised patients. Expand
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Fungemias were reviewed in 110 immunocompromised patients hospitalized between November 1, 1974, and December 31, 1977, a Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, and the over-all mortality of the 110 patients with fungemia was 79 percent whereas only 23 percent of the patients with C. parapsilosis fungemia died. Expand
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