Candida pyralidae killer toxin disrupts the cell wall of Brettanomyces bruxellensis in red grape juice

@article{Mehlomakulu2017CandidaPK,
  title={Candida pyralidae killer toxin disrupts the cell wall of Brettanomyces bruxellensis in red grape juice},
  author={Ngwekazi Nwabisa Mehlomakulu and Kelly J Prior and Mathabatha Evodia Setati and Benoit Divol},
  journal={Journal of Applied Microbiology},
  year={2017},
  volume={122}
}
The control of the wine spoilage yeast Brettanomyces bruxellensis using biological methods such as killer toxins (instead of the traditional chemical methods, e.g. SO2) has been the focus of several studies within the last decade. Our previous research demonstrated that the killer toxins CpKT1 and CpKT2 isolated from the wine yeast Candida pyralidae were active and stable under winemaking conditions. In this study, we report the possible mode of action of CpKT1 on B. bruxellensis cells in red… Expand
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