Candida albicans – a fungal Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde

@article{Gow2002CandidaA,
  title={Candida albicans – a fungal Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde},
  author={N. Gow},
  journal={Mycologist},
  year={2002},
  volume={16},
  pages={33-35}
}
  • N. Gow
  • Published 2002
  • Medicine
  • Mycologist
Twenty years ago a clinician could have been excused for being largely ignorant about fungi as disease causing agents. How things have changed! In the league table of serious infections in which microbes enter the bloodstream (septicaemia) and then challenge the functioning of the vital organs, the fungus Candida albicans (Robin) Berkhout has risen through the ranks of obscurity to rival some of the most common bacterial septicaemias (Calderone, 2002). It may not be appreciated that there are… Expand
1 Citations
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TLDR
These observations demonstrated that C. albicans can recombine sexually, and strains that were subtly altered at the mating-type-like (MTL) locus were capable of mating after inoculation into a mammalian host. Expand
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Evidence for mating included formation of stable prototrophs from strains with complementing auxotrophic markers; these contained both MTL alleles and molecular markers from both parents and were tetraploid in DNA content and mononucleate. Expand