Cancer statistics, 2012

@article{Siegel2012CancerS2,
  title={Cancer statistics, 2012},
  author={Rebecca L. Siegel and Deepa Naishadham and Ahmedin Jemal},
  journal={CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians},
  year={2012},
  volume={62}
}
Each year, the American Cancer Society estimates the numbers of new cancer cases and deaths expected in the United States in the current year and compiles the most recent data on cancer incidence, mortality, and survival based on incidence data from the National Cancer Institute, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries and mortality data from the National Center for Health Statistics. A total of 1,638,910 new cancer cases… Expand
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