Cancer risks attributable to low doses of ionizing radiation: Assessing what we really know

@article{Brenner2003CancerRA,
  title={Cancer risks attributable to low doses of ionizing radiation: Assessing what we really know},
  author={David J. Brenner and Richard Doll and Dudley T. Goodhead and Eric J. Hall and Charles E. Land and John B. Little and Jay H. Lubin and Dale L Preston and R. Julian Preston and Jerome S. Puskin and Elaine Ron and Rainer K. Sachs and Jonathan M Samet and Richard B. Setlow and Marco Zaider},
  journal={Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America},
  year={2003},
  volume={100},
  pages={13761 - 13766}
}
  • D. Brenner, R. Doll, M. Zaider
  • Published 10 November 2003
  • Medicine
  • Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
High doses of ionizing radiation clearly produce deleterious consequences in humans, including, but not exclusively, cancer induction. At very low radiation doses the situation is much less clear, but the risks of low-dose radiation are of societal importance in relation to issues as varied as screening tests for cancer, the future of nuclear power, occupational radiation exposure, frequent-flyer risks, manned space exploration, and radiological terrorism. We review the difficulties involved in… 

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