Cancer risk across mammals

@article{Vincze2021CancerRA,
  title={Cancer risk across mammals},
  author={Orsolya Vincze and Fernando Colchero and Jean‐François Lema{\^i}tre and Dalia A. Conde and Samuel Pavard and Margaux Bieuville and Araxi O. Urrutia and Beata Ujvari and Amy M. Boddy and Carlo C. Maley and Fr{\'e}d{\'e}ric Thomas and Mathieu Giraudeau},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2021},
  volume={601},
  pages={263 - 267}
}
Cancer is a ubiquitous disease of metazoans, predicted to disproportionately affect larger, long-lived organisms owing to their greater number of cell divisions, and thus increased probability of somatic mutations 1 , 2 . While elevated cancer risk with larger body size and/or longevity has been documented within species 3 – 5 , Peto’s paradox indicates the apparent lack of such an association among taxa 6 . Yet, unequivocal empirical evidence for Peto’s paradox is lacking, stemming from the… 
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