Cancer and non-cancer effects in Japanese atomic bomb survivors

@article{Little2009CancerAN,
  title={Cancer and non-cancer effects in Japanese atomic bomb survivors},
  author={Mark P. Little},
  journal={Journal of Radiological Protection},
  year={2009},
  volume={29},
  pages={A43 - A59}
}
  • M. Little
  • Published 1 June 2009
  • Medicine
  • Journal of Radiological Protection
The survivors of the atomic bombings in Hiroshima and Nagasaki are a general population of all ages and sexes and, because of the wide and well characterised range of doses received, have been used by many scientific committees (International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR), Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiations (BEIR)) as the basis of population cancer risk estimates following radiation exposure… 

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The relative risks of leukaemia in studies of persons exposed to appreciable doses of ionizing radiation in the course of treatment for a variety of malignant and non-malignant conditions in childhood are generally less than those in the Japanese A-bomb survivor data.

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