Cancer-Related Symptoms Most Concerning to Parents During the Last Week and Last Day of Their Child's Life

@article{Pritchard2008CancerRelatedSM,
  title={Cancer-Related Symptoms Most Concerning to Parents During the Last Week and Last Day of Their Child's Life},
  author={M. Pritchard and E. Burghen and D. Srivastava and J. Okuma and Lisa H. Anderson and B. Powell and W. Furman and P. Hinds},
  journal={Pediatrics},
  year={2008},
  volume={121},
  pages={e1301 - e1309}
}
OBJECTIVE. Studies of symptoms in children dying a cancer-related death typically rely on medical chart reviews or parental responses to symptom checklists. However, the mere presence of a symptom does not necessarily correspond with the distress it can cause the child's parents. The purpose of this study was to identify the cancer-related symptoms that most concerned parents during the last days of their child's life and the strategies parents identified as helpful with their child's care… Expand
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