Corpus ID: 13077851

Canadian Diabetes Association National Nutrition Committee Technical Review: Non-nutritive Intense Sweeteners in Diabetes Management

@inproceedings{Gougeon2004CanadianDA,
  title={Canadian Diabetes Association National Nutrition Committee Technical Review: Non-nutritive Intense Sweeteners in Diabetes Management},
  author={R{\'e}jeanne Gougeon and Mark Spidel and Kristy Lee and Catherine J. Field},
  year={2004}
}
The current Canadian Diabetes Association Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Prevention and Management of Diabetes in Canada state that up to 10% of daily calories can be derived from sugars. However, individuals with diabetes may also be relying on alternative, low-calorie sweetening agents (providing little or no calories along with sweet taste) to control carbohydrate intake, blood glucose, weight and dental health. Most low-calorie sweeteners, sometimes called intense or artificial… Expand
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