Canada's pregnancy-related mortality rates: doing well but room for improvement.

@article{Verstraeten2015CanadasPM,
  title={Canada's pregnancy-related mortality rates: doing well but room for improvement.},
  author={Barbara S E Verstraeten and Jane Mijovic-Kondejewski and Jun Takeda and Satomi Tanaka and David M. Olson},
  journal={Clinical and investigative medicine. Medecine clinique et experimentale},
  year={2015},
  volume={38 1},
  pages={
          E15-22
        }
}
PURPOSE Canada's perinatal, infant and maternal mortality rates were examined and compared with other Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) countries. The type and the quality of the available data and best practices in several OECD countries were evaluated. SOURCE A literature search was performed in PubMed and the Cochrane Library. Vital statistics data were obtained from the OECD Health Database and Statistics Canada and subjected to secondary analysis. PRINCIPAL… Expand
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