Can we undo our first impressions? The role of reinterpretation in reversing implicit evaluations.

@article{Mann2015CanWU,
  title={Can we undo our first impressions? The role of reinterpretation in reversing implicit evaluations.},
  author={Thomas C. Mann and Melissa J. Ferguson},
  journal={Journal of personality and social psychology},
  year={2015},
  volume={108 6},
  pages={823-49}
}
Little work has examined whether implicit evaluations can be effectively "undone" after learning new revelations. Across 7 experiments, participants fully reversed their implicit evaluation of a novel target person after reinterpreting earlier information. Revision occurred across multiple implicit evaluation measures (Experiments 1a and 1b), and only when the new information prompted a reinterpretation of prior learning versus did not (Experiment 2). The updating required active consideration… CONTINUE READING
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