Can the strength of candidates be discriminated based on ability to circumvent the biasing effect of prose? Implications for evaluation and education.

@article{Eva2003CanTS,
  title={Can the strength of candidates be discriminated based on ability to circumvent the biasing effect of prose? Implications for evaluation and education.},
  author={Kevin W Eva and Timothy J Wood},
  journal={Academic medicine : journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges},
  year={2003},
  volume={78 10 Suppl},
  pages={
          S78-81
        }
}
  • Kevin W Eva, Timothy J Wood
  • Published in
    Academic medicine : journal…
    2003
  • Medicine
  • PURPOSE Residents have greater confidence in diagnoses when indicative features are presented in medical terminology. The current study examines the implications of this result by assessing its relationship to clinical ability. METHOD Candidates writing the Medical Council of Canada's Qualifying Examination completed six questions in which the terminology used was manipulated. The influence of aptitude was examined by contrasting groups based on performance on the medicine section of Part I… CONTINUE READING

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