Can the Evolution of Plant Defense Lead to Plant‐Herbivore Mutualism?

@article{deMazancourt2001CanTE,
  title={Can the Evolution of Plant Defense Lead to Plant‐Herbivore Mutualism?},
  author={Claire de Mazancourt and Michel Loreau and Ulf Dieckmann},
  journal={The American Naturalist},
  year={2001},
  volume={158},
  pages={109 - 123}
}
Moderate rates of herbivory can enhance primary production. This hypothesis has led to a controversy as to whether such positive effects can result in mutualistic interactions between plants and herbivores. We present a model for the ecology and evolution of plant‐herbivore systems to address this question. In this model, herbivores have a positive indirect effect on plants through recycling of a limiting nutrient. Plants can evolve but are constrained by a trade‐off between growth and… Expand
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