Can minimum convex polygon home ranges be used to draw biologically meaningful conclusions?

@article{Nilsen2007CanMC,
  title={Can minimum convex polygon home ranges be used to draw biologically meaningful conclusions?},
  author={Erlend B. Nilsen and Simen Pedersen and John D. C. Linnell},
  journal={Ecological Research},
  year={2007},
  volume={23},
  pages={635-639}
}
Many conclusions about mammalian ranging behaviour have been drawn based on minimum convex polygon (MCP) estimates of home range size, although several studies have revealed its unpredictable nature compared to that of the kernel density estimator. We investigated to what extent the choice of home range estimator affected the biological interpretation in comparative studies. We found no discrepancy when the question asked covered a wide range of taxa, as real and very large differences in range… 

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