Can attention selectively bias bistable perception? Differences between binocular rivalry and ambiguous figures.

@article{Meng2004CanAS,
  title={Can attention selectively bias bistable perception? Differences between binocular rivalry and ambiguous figures.},
  author={Ming Meng and Frank Tong},
  journal={Journal of vision},
  year={2004},
  volume={4 7},
  pages={539-51}
}
It is debated whether different forms of bistable perception result from common or separate neural mechanisms. Binocular rivalry involves perceptual alternations between competing monocular images, whereas ambiguous figures such as the Necker cube lead to alternations between two possible pictorial interpretations. Previous studies have shown that observers can voluntarily control the alternation rate of both rivalry and Necker cube reversal, perhaps suggesting that bistable perception results… CONTINUE READING
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