Can We Lose Memory for Music? A Case of Music Agnosia in a Nonmusician

@article{Peretz1996CanWL,
  title={Can We Lose Memory for Music? A Case of Music Agnosia in a Nonmusician},
  author={Isabelle Peretz},
  journal={Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience},
  year={1996},
  volume={8},
  pages={481-496}
}
  • I. Peretz
  • Published 1 November 1996
  • Psychology
  • Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience
A follow-up study of a patient, C.N., with a severe auditory agnosia limited to music is reported. After bilateral temporal lobe damage, C.N., whose cognitive and speech functions are otherwise normal, is totally unable to identify or to experience a sense of familiarity with musical excerpts that were once highly familiar to her. However, she can recognize the lyrics that usually accompany the songs. She can also identify familiar sounds, such as animal cries. Thus, her agnosia appears highly… 
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