Can Two Wrongs Make a Right? Coin-Tossing Games and Parrondo’s Paradox

@article{Percus2002CanTW,
  title={Can Two Wrongs Make a Right? Coin-Tossing Games and Parrondo’s Paradox},
  author={O. E. Percus and J. Percus},
  journal={The Mathematical Intelligencer},
  year={2002},
  volume={24},
  pages={68-72}
}
  • O. E. Percus, J. Percus
  • Published 2002
  • Mathematics
  • The Mathematical Intelligencer
  • Background On frequent occasions, a logical oddity comes along, which attracts a sizeable audience. One of the most recent is known as Parrondo's paradox [5, 6]. Briefly, it is the observation that random selection (or merely alternation) of the playing of two asymptotically losing games* can result in a winning game. Conceptually similar situations involving only the processing of statistical data are not novel. What has been referred to as Simpson's paradox [8] is typified by this scenario… CONTINUE READING
    16 Citations
    Parrondo’s Principle
    Limit theorems for Parrondo's paradox
    • 28
    • PDF
    How strong can the Parrondo effect be?
    • 2
    • PDF
    Parrondo's paradox
    • 41
    • PDF
    Discrete–time ratchets, the Fokker–Planck equation and Parrondo's paradox
    • 35
    • PDF
    Can two chaotic systems give rise to order
    • 71
    • PDF
    Parrondian Games in Discrete Dynamic Systems
    • 1
    • PDF

    References

    SHOWING 1-10 OF 10 REFERENCES
    Parrondo's paradox
    • 161
    • PDF
    Game theory: Losing strategies can win by Parrondo's paradox
    • 251
    • PDF
    The paradox of Parrondo's games
    • G. P. Harmer, D. Abbott, P. Taylor
    • Mathematics
    • Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series A: Mathematical, Physical and Engineering Sciences
    • 2000
    • 67
    • PDF
    Decisions and elections
    • 43
    New paradoxical games based on brownian ratchets
    • 210
    • PDF
    Decisions and elections : explaining the unexpected
    • 238
    Randomly rattled ratchets
    • 53
    Playing Both Sides
    • 13
    Stochastic processes
    • 9,387
    The Interpretation of Interaction in Contingency Tables
    • 1,474
    • PDF