Can Tactile Stimuli Be Subitised? An Unresolved Controversy within the Literature on Numerosity Judgments

@article{Gallace2008CanTS,
  title={Can Tactile Stimuli Be Subitised? An Unresolved Controversy within the Literature on Numerosity Judgments},
  author={Alberto Gallace and Hong Z. Tan and Charles Spence},
  journal={Perception},
  year={2008},
  volume={37},
  pages={782 - 800}
}
There is a growing interest in the question whether the phenomenon of subitising (fast and accurate detection of fewer than 4–5 stimuli presented simultaneously), widely thought to affect numerosity judgments in vision, can also affect the processing of tactile stimuli. In a recent study, in which multiple tactile stimuli were simultaneously presented across the body surface, Gallace et al (2006 Perception 35 247–266) concluded that tactile stimuli cannot be subitised. By contrast, Riggs et al… 

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