Can Learning Constituency Opinion Affect How Legislators Vote? Results from a Field Experiment

@inproceedings{Butler2011CanLC,
  title={Can Learning Constituency Opinion Affect How Legislators Vote? Results from a Field Experiment},
  author={Daniel Mark Butler and David W. Nickerson},
  year={2011}
}
When legislators are uninformed about public opinion, does learning constituents' opinion affect how legislators vote? We conducted a fully randomized field experiment to answer this question. We surveyed 10,690 New Mexicans about the Governor's spending proposals for a special summer session held in the summer of 2008. District-specific survey results were then shared with a randomly selected half of the legislature. The legislators receiving their district-specific survey results were much… CONTINUE READING

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