Can Information Decrease Political Polarization? Evidence From the U.S. Taxpayer Receipt

@article{Duhaime2017CanID,
  title={Can Information Decrease Political Polarization? Evidence From the U.S. Taxpayer Receipt},
  author={Erik P. Duhaime and Evan P. Apfelbaum},
  journal={Social Psychological and Personality Science},
  year={2017},
  volume={8},
  pages={736 - 745}
}
Scholars, politicians, and laypeople alike bemoan the high level of political polarization in the United States, but little is known about how to bring the views of liberals and conservatives closer together. Previous research finds that providing people with information regarding a contentious issue is ineffective for reducing polarization because people process such information in a biased manner. Here, we show that information can reduce political polarization below baseline levels and also… 

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