Corpus ID: 133277345

Can Honey Bees Assist in Area Reduction and Landmine Detection

@article{Bromenshenk2003CanHB,
  title={Can Honey Bees Assist in Area Reduction and Landmine Detection},
  author={J. Bromenshenk and C. Henderson and Robert A. Seccomb and S. D. Rice and R. T. Etter and S. Bender and P. Rodacy and J. Shaw and N. Seldomridge and L. Spangler and James J. Wilson},
  journal={Journal of Conventional Weapons Destruction},
  year={2003},
  volume={7},
  pages={5}
}
Biological organisms as volatile compound detectors: a review.
TLDR
This paper reviews the literature regarding the current, and potential future, use of biological organisms as sensors for forensic science applications and reveals an increasing interest in olfactory receptors for detecting volatile compounds associated with forensically significant substances such as explosives and illicit drugs. Expand
WINGBEAT MODULATION DETECTION OF HONEY BEES USING A CONTINUOUS WAVE LASER SYSTEM
Using operant conditioning, researchers at the University of Montana have developed a technique for training entire colonies of honeybees to actively seek out explosive devices. The problem with thisExpand
Humanitarian Demining Using an Insect Based Chemical Unmanned Aerial Vehicle
TLDR
This chapter analyzes the relationship between the chemical detection and localization problem and its biological solution, and shows how the understanding of the biological solution can be exploited to construct efficient autonomous chemo-sensing Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (cUAV). Expand
A Method for Detection of Small Moving Objects in UAV Videos
Detection of small moving objects is an important research area with applications including monitoring of flying insects, studying their foraging behavior, using insect pollinators to monitorExpand
The impact of training method on odour learning and generalisation in detection animals
Abstract Odour detection animals are required to learn many individual odours during training. Most organisations and agencies use single-odour (sequential) training, where animals learn one odourExpand
Bioindicators and biomonitoring: honeybees and hive products as pollution impact assessment tools for the Mediterranean area
The global range of the environmental quality issues we all face necessitates integrated action from all of the countries that suffer from a particular environmental issue. We must be able to obtainExpand
Sniffer Bees as a Reliable Tool for Andrographis paniculata Detection
Honey bees of Apis mellifera could be trained to be highly reliable sniffers for the detection of Andrographis paniculata using the classical Pavlovian conditioning training method with high successExpand
Beyond AI: Multi-Intelligence (MI) Combining Natural and Artificial Intelligences in Hybrid Beings and Systems
Framing strongly influences actions among technology proponents and end-users. Underlying much debate about artificial intelligence (AI) are several fundamental shortcomings in its framing. First,Expand
Bees as Biosensors: Chemosensory Ability, Honey Bee Monitoring Systems, and Emergent Sensor Technologies Derived from the Pollinator Syndrome
TLDR
This review focuses on critical milestones in the development path for the use of bees, mainly honey bees and bumble bees, as sentinels and biosensors, which when coupled with emerging tracking and mapping technologies create novel potential for research, as well as bee and crop management. Expand
...
1
2
3
...

References

SHOWING 1-2 OF 2 REFERENCES
Alternatives for Landmine
  • Journal of Conventional Weapons Destruction,
  • 2003
Pollution Monitoring of Puget Sound with Honey Bees
TLDR
Results show that the greatest concentrations of contaminants occur close to Commencement Bay and that honey bees are effective as large-scale monitors of environmental contaminants over large geographic areas. Expand