Can Feeling Too Good Be Bad?

@article{Gruber2011CanFT,
  title={Can Feeling Too Good Be Bad?},
  author={June Gruber},
  journal={Current Directions in Psychological Science},
  year={2011},
  volume={20},
  pages={217 - 221}
}
  • J. Gruber
  • Published 1 August 2011
  • Psychology
  • Current Directions in Psychological Science
Positive emotions are vital to attaining important goals, nurturing social bonds, and promoting cognitive flexibility. However, one question remains relatively unaddressed: Can positive emotions also be a source of dysfunction and negative outcomes? An ideal point of entry to understand how positive emotion can go awry is bipolar disorder, a psychiatric disorder marked by abnormally elevated positive emotion. In this review I provide an overview of recent experimental evidence from individuals… 

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  • J. Gruber
  • Psychology
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  • 2011
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