Can Employment Reduce Lawlessness and Rebellion? A Field Experiment with High-Risk Men in a Fragile State

@article{Blattman2016CanER,
  title={Can Employment Reduce Lawlessness and Rebellion? A Field Experiment with High-Risk Men in a Fragile State},
  author={Christopher Blattman and Jeannie Annan},
  journal={American Political Science Review},
  year={2016},
  volume={110},
  pages={1 - 17}
}
States and aid agencies use employment programs to rehabilitate high-risk men in the belief that peaceful work opportunities will deter them from crime and violence. Rigorous evidence is rare. We experimentally evaluate a program of agricultural training, capital inputs, and counseling for Liberian ex-fighters who were illegally mining or occupying rubber plantations. Fourteen months after the program ended, men who accepted the program offer increased their farm employment and profits, and… 
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