Can Culture Be Copyrighted?1

@article{Brown1998CanCB,
  title={Can Culture Be Copyrighted?1},
  author={Michael F. Brown},
  journal={Current Anthropology},
  year={1998},
  volume={39},
  pages={193 - 222}
}
The digital revolution has dramatically increased the ability of individuals and corporations to appropriate and profit from the cultural knowledge of indigenous peoples, which is largely unprotected by existing intellectual property law. In response, legal scholars, anthropologists, and native activists now propose new legal regimes designed to defend indigenous cultures by radically expanding the notion of copyright. Unfortunately, these proposals are often informed by romantic assumptions… Expand
233 Citations
Māori Intellectual Property Rights and the Formation of Ethnic Boundaries
  • T. Meijl
  • History
  • International Journal of Cultural Property
  • 2009
The hidden demography of new media ethics
Who Owns Native Nature? Discourses of Rights to Land, Culture, and Knowledge in New Zealand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 18 REFERENCES
" The end of anthropology ( at Hopi ) ? " in Indians and anthropologists : Vine Deloria
  • 1997
Cultural rights and ethnography
  • Bulletin of the General Anthropology Division , American Anthropological Association
  • 1995
For all those who were Indian in a former life
  • Cultural Survival Quarterly
  • 1994
...
1
2
...