Can ‘ehealth’ technology deliver on its promise of pain management for all?

@article{Eccleston2011CanT,
  title={Can ‘ehealth’ technology deliver on its promise of pain management for all?},
  author={Christopher Eccleston},
  journal={PAIN{\textregistered}},
  year={2011},
  volume={152},
  pages={1701-1702}
}
Developments in the use of e-health for chronic pain management.
TLDR
This selective review seeks to illustrate some of the ways in which e-health has been applied to chronic pain, and examples of technology use are provided within the areas of information provision, assessment and monitoring, and remote therapy.
Self-administered cognitive behavioural therapy for women with chronic pelvic pain: design and pilot evaluation
TLDR
The aim of the research reported in this thesis was to develop and pilot-test a technology-based CBT intervention for women experiencing CPP utilising a co-design approach and deliver a smart-phone intervention involving mindfulness relaxation, cognitive restructuring, and pain education which women experience CPP would use daily.
The use of mobile technology in waiting rooms to leverage women’s empowerment: A conceptual context
TLDR
This research suggests that there is room for improvement in existing processes through use of mobile technology with carefully vetted materials which indicate a doctor is interested in the patient’s well-being.
Are eHealth interventions for adults who are scheduled for or have undergone bariatric surgery as effective as usual care? A systematic review.
Empowering Patients with Persistent Pain Using an Internet-based Self-Management Program.
The effectiveness of various computer-based interventions for patients with chronic pain or functional somatic syndromes: A systematic review and meta-analysis
TLDR
There is a minority of good quality evidence for small positive average effects of computer-based (cognitive) behavior change interventions, similar to traditional modes, and these effects may be sustainable.
Internet sites offering adolescents help with headache, abdominal pain, and dysmenorrhoea: a description of content, quality, and peer interactions.
TLDR
Internet pain resources are of low quality and questionable value in providing help to adolescents and future research should explore how to improve quality.
"Focus on the Good" - Participant Perspectives after Engaging in an Online Pain Self-Management Program
TLDR
Evaluating participants’ perspectives after engaging in an 8week online pain self-management program can assist health care providers in understanding how online programs may assist in chronic disease selfmanagement for a multitude of health problems.
Participant Perspectives on Benefits and Challenges of Engaging in an Online Pain Self-Management Program
TLDR
Evaluating participants' perspectives after engaging in an 8-week online pain self- management program can assist health care providers and program developers in understanding how online programs may improve chronic disease self-management for a multitude of health problems.
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