Calorie restriction in rhesus monkeys

@article{Mattison2003CalorieRI,
  title={Calorie restriction in rhesus monkeys},
  author={Julie A. Mattison and Mark A. Lane and George S. Roth and Donald K Ingram},
  journal={Experimental Gerontology},
  year={2003},
  volume={38},
  pages={35-46}
}
Calorie restriction and aging in nonhuman primates.
TLDR
Extended CR appears to extend the lifespan of rhesus monkeys, which exhibited lower body fat; slower rate of muscle loss with age; lower incidence of neoplasia, cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and endometriosis; improved insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance; and no apparent adverse effect on bone health, as well as a reduction in total energy expenditure.
Caloric restriction and aging in primates: Relevance to humans and possible CR mimetics
TLDR
Even if CR can be shown to impact upon human aging, it is unlikely that most people will be able to maintain the strict dietary control required for this regimen, so elucidation of the biological mechanisms of CR and development of alternative strategies to yield similar benefits is of primary importance.
Caloric Restriction Delays Disease Onset and Mortality in Rhesus Monkeys
TLDR
Findings of a 20-year longitudinal adult-onset CR study in rhesus monkeys aimed at filling this critical gap in aging research demonstrate that CR slows aging in a primate species.
Effect of age and caloric restriction on circadian adrenal steroid rhythms in rhesus macaques
General characteristics of rhesus macaques used in long-term aging studies
TLDR
Extended CR appears to extend the lifespan of rhesus monkeys, which exhibited lower body fat; slower rate of muscle loss with age; lower incidence of neoplasia, cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and endometriosis; improved insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance; and no apparent adverse effect on bone health, as well as a reduction in total energy expenditure.
La restriction calorique chez les primates
TLDR
Through the longitudinal findings in the Grey Mouse Lemur (Microcebus murinus), the importance of primate studies in the context of research on aging and their potential to advance the development of molecules which can mimic the beneficial effects of CR are stressed.
Skeletal effects of long-term caloric restriction in rhesus monkeys
TLDR
Overall, it was found that bone mass and density declined over time with generally higher levels in C compared to R animals, and the lower bone mass in R animals reflects the smaller body size and not pathological osteopenia.
Effects of Moderate Calorie Restriction on Ovarian Function and Decline in Rhesus Monkeys
TLDR
The results of this study have provided evidence for the utility of the rhesus monkey as a model for human menopause and the efficacy of moderate CR in monkeys, and demonstrated that CCCT is efficacious in monkeys and the most cost effective and best predictor of ovarian response.
Does caloric restriction extend life in wild mice?
TLDR
No difference in mean longevity between ad libitum (AL) and CR dietary groups is found, although a maximum likelihood fitted Gompertz mortality model indicated a significantly shallower slope and higher intercept for the CR group, and a strong anticancer effect of CR is noted.
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References

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Calorie restriction lowers body temperature in rhesus monkeys, consistent with a postulated anti-aging mechanism in rodents.
  • M. Lane, D. Baer, G. Roth
  • Biology
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
  • 1996
TLDR
Reductions in body temperature and energy expenditure are consistent with findings in rodent studies in which aging rate was retarded by CR, strengthening the possibility that CR may exert beneficial effects in primates analogous to those observed in rodents.
Beyond the rodent model: Calorie restriction in rhesus monkeys
TLDR
Preliminary findings suggest the possibility that CR in rhesus monkeys could slow the rate of aging and reduce age-related disease, specifically diabetes and cardiovascular disease, in longer-lived species, including humans.
Caloric restriction increases HDL2 levels in rhesus monkeys ( Macaca mulatta).
TLDR
Results suggest that CR, as mediated by its beneficial effect on body composition and glucose metabolism, could prolong human life by decreasing the incidence of atherosclerosis.
Calorie restriction in nonhuman primates: effects on diabetes and cardiovascular disease risk.
  • M. Lane, D. Ingram, G. Roth
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TLDR
It is shown that monkeys onCR have lower blood pressure, reduced body fat, and a reduced trunk:leg fat ratio, and monkeys on CR have reduced triglycerides and cholesterol and have increased levels of HDL2B, which is associated with increased cardiovascular disease in humans.
Calorie restriction and skeletal mass in rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta): evidence for an effect mediated through changes in body size.
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  • 2001
TLDR
Analysis indicated that lean mass, but not fat mass, was a strong predictor of bone mass in both CR and control monkeys, and neither biochemical markers of bone turnover nor hormonal regulators of bone metabolism were affected by long-term CR.
Calorie Restriction in Nonhuman Primates: Implications for Age-Related Disease Risk
TLDR
Calorie restriction—undernutrition without malnutrition—ranks among the most reproducible and widely used research paradigms in gerontologic research, but it is not known if CR has similar effects in longer-lived species more closely related to humans.
Measures of body size and growth in rhesus and squirrel monkeys subjected to long‐term dietary restriction
TLDR
The results reported here concern the hypothesis that DR imposed during various developmental stages in these two primate species would affect morphometric parameters obtained at different occasions during the first 5 years of the study.
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