Call–Fleming syndrome associated with subarachnoid haemorrhage: three new cases

@article{Moustafa2007CallFlemingSA,
  title={Call–Fleming syndrome associated with subarachnoid haemorrhage: three new cases},
  author={Ramez Reda Moustafa and C M C Allen and J. C. Baron},
  journal={Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery, and Psychiatry},
  year={2007},
  volume={79},
  pages={602 - 605}
}
Background: The Call–Fleming syndrome (CFS) comprises acute severe recurrent (thunderclap) headaches, occasional transient or fluctuating neurological abnormalities and reversible segmental cerebral vasoconstriction. It is a benign condition with an excellent prognosis, yet because it is often clinically and radiologically similar to a number of commonly encountered conditions, diagnostic difficulties may arise, leading to inappropriate, and even potentially harmful, investigative and… 
Call-Fleming syndrome associated with convexity subarachnoid hemorrhage
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Call-Fleming syndrome
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A literature review shows that RCVS can also manifest as an unspecific headache, such as a single severe headache episode, a mild or a progressive headache, and a subset of patients with severe RCVS presents without any headache, but frequently with seizures, focal neurological deficits, confusion or coma, in the setting of stroke or posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome.
Post Hemorrhagic Hemicrania Continua In A Patient With Orgasmic Paroxysmal Hemicrania
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Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndromes presenting with subarachnoid hemorrhage: a case series
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Although the initial clinical and angiographic appearance of RCVS may be confused for vasospasm related to aneurysmal SAH or primary angiitis of the CNS, its clinical, laboratory and imaging features assist in diagnosis.
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