Calcium utilization: effect of varying level and source of dietary protein.

@article{Zemel1988CalciumUE,
  title={Calcium utilization: effect of varying level and source of dietary protein.},
  author={Michael B Zemel},
  journal={The American journal of clinical nutrition},
  year={1988},
  volume={48 3 Suppl},
  pages={
          880-3
        }
}
  • M. Zemel
  • Published 1988
  • Chemistry, Medicine
  • The American journal of clinical nutrition
Dietary protein exerts a significant calciuretic effect. A twofold increase in protein at constant levels of calcium and phosphorus intakes causes a 50% increase in urinary calcium. The protein-induced hypercalciuria results primarily from decreased fractional renal tubular reabsorption of calcium associated with catabolism of excess sulfur amino acids and the resultant urinary excretion of acid and sulfate. A protein-induced elevation in glomerular filtration rate also contributes to the… Expand
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TLDR
Under controlled dietary conditions the level of dietary protein has a profound and sustained effect on urinary calcium and calcium retention of man, and it appears that high protein intakes may increase the requirements for both calcium and phosphorus. Expand
Effect of level of protein intake on calcium metabolism and on parathyroid and renal function in the adult human male.
TLDR
Urinary calcium was elevated significantly when the protein intake was increased and the increase in urinary calcium caused by the high protein diet appears to be due in part to an increase in the filtered load of calcium by the glomeruli and a decrease in calcium reabsorption by the renal tubules. Expand
Role of the sulfur-containing amino acids in protein-induced hypercalciuria in men.
TLDR
The phosphorus supplement effectively prevented the hypercalciuria caused by adding the sulfur amino acids to the low protein diet. Expand
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TLDR
The data indicate that protein-induced hypercalciuria is due to an increase in glomerular filtration rate and a decrease in fractional renal tubular reabsorption of calcium, the latter of which may be caused by the increased acid load on the renaltubular cells. Expand
The role of insulin and parathyroid hormone in the protein-induced calciuria of man
The consumption of dietary protein has been shown to increase urinary calcium due to a reduction in the renal tubular reabsorption of calcium. This experiment was designed to examine the postprandialExpand
Renal acid, urinary cyclic AMP, and hydroxyproline excretion as affected by level of protein, sulfur amino acid, and phosphorus intake.
TLDR
Increases in urinary hydroxyproline and calcium were well correlated indicating that, at low calcium intakes, protein or Saa-induced increases in urinary calcium result in increased bone resorption which is reduced by the administration of phosphorus. Expand
Urinary calcium and calcium balance in young men as affected by level of protein and phosphorus intake.
Eight young adult males were subjects in a 51-day metabolic study conducted to examine the effects of level of protein and of phosphorus intake on urinary calcium and calcium balance. Two levels ofExpand
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TLDR
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TLDR
It is proposed that a major factor in the hypercalciuria of high protein feeding is the production and excretion of sulfate, which is related mainly to differences in their sulfur amino acid content. Expand
Calcium retention of young adult males as affected by level of protein and of calcium intake.
TLDR
Calcium absorption was not affected by dietary protein at an intake of 500 mg calcium, but significantly more calcium was absorbed at medium or high protein intakes than at low when 800 or 1400 mg calcium was given, the maximal protein effect having been reached at the 95-g protein level. Expand
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