Calcium phosphate: an alternative calcium compound for dietary prevention of colon cancer? A study on intestinal and faecal parameters in healthy volunteers

@article{Cats1993CalciumPA,
  title={Calcium phosphate: an alternative calcium compound for dietary prevention of colon cancer? A study on intestinal and faecal parameters in healthy volunteers},
  author={Arnold Cats and Nanno H. Mulder and E. G. E. de Vries and E T Oremus and W M Kreumer and Jan H. Kleibeuker},
  journal={European Journal of Cancer Prevention},
  year={1993},
  volume={2},
  pages={409–416}
}
In an effort to reduce the risk of colorectal cancer development, oral calcium carbonate supplementation has been used in previous studies for the precipitation of cytotoxic bile acids and fatty acids. In human intervention trials its effect on mucosal hyperproliferation in the colorectum has not always been satisfactory. Because the complexation of calcium and bile acids requires the formation of calcium phosphate, we performed an intervention study in 14 healthy volunteers, giving them 1,500… 

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