Calcium metabolism in adults with severe aortic valve stenosis and preserved renal function.

Abstract

Data suggest a link of aortic stenosis (AS) with calcium and bone metabolism. To further investigate this, the following parameters were analyzed in 38 patients with severe AS and in 38 age- and gender-matched controls, without obstructive coronary artery disease and with preserved renal function: calcium, phosphate, 1,25(OH(2))-vitamin D(3), intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH), and osteoprotegerin. Patients with AS had significantly higher serum levels of calcium (2.63 +/- 0.28 vs 2.48 +/- 0.23 mmol/L, p <0.01) and phosphate (1.56 +/- 0.33 vs 1.38 +/- 0.26 mmol/L, p <0.01) and increased calcium-phosphorus products (4.16 +/- 1.13 vs 3.44 +/- 0.89 mmol/L(2), p = 0.003). Notably, the iPTH concentration in the AS group was lower, and significantly more patients in the AS group had levels less than the study median of 60 ng/L. Osteoprotegerin was elevated in patients with AS, confirming reports in other populations (9.94 +/- 5.96 vs 6.73 +/- 4.28 pmol/L, p = 0.009). The relations of several parameters to iPTH were also altered (AS vs controls): calcium and iPTH, 0.071 +/- 0.034 versus 0.046 +/- 0.023, p <0.0001; phosphate and iPTH, 0.042 +/- 0.020 versus 0.025 +/- 0.013, p <0.0001; vitamin D and iPTH, 0.99 +/- 0.61 versus 0.63 +/- 0.46, p = 0.006; and osteoprotegerin and iPTH, 0.24 +/- 0.15 versus 0.12 +/- 0.09, p <0.0001. In conclusion, these data support a hypothesis connecting (severe) AS to altered calcium and bone homeostasis.

DOI: 10.1016/j.amjcard.2009.10.065

Cite this paper

@article{Akat2010CalciumMI, title={Calcium metabolism in adults with severe aortic valve stenosis and preserved renal function.}, author={Kemal Akat and Jens Johannes Kaden and Fabian Schmitz and Silke Ewering and Anja Anton and Sebastian Klomfass and Rainer Hoffmann and Jan Rudolf Ortlepp}, journal={The American journal of cardiology}, year={2010}, volume={105 6}, pages={862-4} }