Calcium absorption and bone mineral density in celiacs after long term treatment with gluten-free diet and adequate calcium intake

@article{Pazianas2004CalciumAA,
  title={Calcium absorption and bone mineral density in celiacs after long term treatment with gluten-free diet and adequate calcium intake},
  author={Michael Pazianas and G. P. Butcher and J. M. Subhani and P. J. Finch and Liza Ang and C. Collins and Robert Proulx Heaney and M. Zaidi and J. Douglas Maxwell},
  journal={Osteoporosis International},
  year={2004},
  volume={16},
  pages={56-63}
}
Calcium malabsorption, hypocalcemia and skeletal demineralization are well-recognized features of untreated celiac disease. This study investigates calcium absorption and bone mineral density (BMD) after a prolonged, over 4 years, treatment with a gluten-free diet. Twenty-four adult females with treated celiac disease and twenty age- and sex-matched control subjects were studied. Mean body mass index (MBI), energy intake, serum calcium, and serum 25(OH)D concentrations in treated celiacs did… 
Low bone mineral density in adult patients with coeliac disease.
TLDR
Evaluating the prevalence of bone mineral density (BMD) and calcium deficiencies in adult patients with coeliac disease and assessing whether a gluten-free diet is sufficiently effective for BMD restoration found that gluten avoidance increased BMD, although the values remained markedly lower in several patients.
Alterations of Inflammatory and Matrix Production Indices in Celiac Disease With Low Bone Mass on Long-term Gluten-free Diet
TLDR
The persistent activation of inflammation should be considered the main pathophysiological mechanism for bone defect in celiac disease patients with bone loss on long-term GFD.
Vitamin D and K status influences bone mineral density and bone accrual in children and adolescents with celiac disease
TLDR
Therapeutic strategies aimed at optimizing vitamin K/D intake may contribute to improved BMD in children with CD; likely due in part to suboptimal vitamin D/K status.
Impact of a gluten-free diet on bone mineral density in celiac patients.
TLDR
Bone health is notably impaired at baseline in CD patients, especially in those with a diagnostic delay, and a GFD modestly improved bone mass density with low impact fractures occurring in one third of patients during the follow up period.
Normal Bone Mineral Density Associates with Duodenal Mucosa Healing in Adult Patients with Celiac Disease on a Gluten-Free Diet
TLDR
A normal DXA scan identified CD patients with DMH, a potential tool in planning endoscopic resampling in older CD patients and with late onset disease, where BMD recovery is not guaranteed, despite a GFD.
Bones of Contention: Bone Mineral Density Recovery in Celiac Disease—A Systematic Review
TLDR
Gluten-free diet adherence resulted in partial recovery of bone density by one year in all studies, and full recovery by the fifth year, and no treatment differences were observed between the gluten- free diet alone and diet plus bisphosphonates in one study.
Bone Mineral Density at Diagnosis of Celiac Disease and after 1 Year of Gluten-Free Diet
TLDR
It is proposed that dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry should be performed at diagnosis of celiac disease in all women and in male aged >30 years, taking into account each risk factor in single patients.
Bone Mineralization in Celiac Disease
TLDR
By means of dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), it is now rapid and easy to obtain semiquantitative values of BMD, however, the question is still open about who and when submit to DXA evaluation in CD, in order to estimate risk of fractures.
Bone Metabolism and Osteoporosis in Adult Celiac Disease
TLDR
It can be concluded that a relevant proportion of CD patients present a low BMD and a variable increase in the risk of bone fractures, and Epidemiological changes in CD make bone density scans more relevant for adult celiacs.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 41 REFERENCES
Intestinal calcium absorption as shown by stable strontium test in celiac disease before and after gluten-free diet.
TLDR
At diagnosis, the patients frequently had intestinal calcium malabsorption, as demonstrated by strontium test, with an early renal compensatory mechanism, and after the gluten-free diet, the normalization of calcium absorption and the decrease of mid-molecule parathyroid hormone suggested anormalization of mineral metabolism, although a positive effect on bone mineral density was not evident at that time.
Bone density and bone metabolism are normal after long-term gluten-free diet in young celiac patients
TLDR
The data show that long-term dietary treatment ensures normal mineralization and bone turnover in celiac patients and in healthy controls, and patients who started GFD before puberty had BMD and bone metabolism measurements comparable to those of patients whostarted GFD during puberty.
Effect of a gluten free diet on osteopenia in adults with newly diagnosed coeliac disease.
TLDR
Treatment of coeliac disease with a gluten free diet is associated with a significant increase in bone mineraldensity, although patients still had lower bone mineral density than controls.
Effect of gluten-free diet on bone mineral content in growing patients with celiac disease.
TLDR
The data indicate that although osteoporosis complicates celiac disease during childhood and adolescence, GFD alone is able to remarkably improve bone mineralization.
Reversal of osteopenia with diet in adult coeliac disease.
TLDR
Low bone mineral density in patients with untreated coeliac disease increases rapidly when treatment with a gluten free diet is followed, and the importance of early diagnosis and treatment in all patients with coleiac disease is emphasised.
Bone and mineral metabolism in adult celiac disease.
TLDR
It was found that a gluten-free diet followed for 1 yr can prevent further bone loss, but no significant differences were detected between the two groups.
Bone mass and metabolism in patients with celiac disease.
Body composition and calcium metabolism in adult treated coeliac disease.
TLDR
It is concluded that this group of treated adult coeliac patients had a reduced fat mass and bone mineral content compared with the general population.
Detection of low bone mineral density by dual energy x ray absorptiometry in unsuspected suboptimally treated coeliac disease.
TLDR
To reduce the risk of osteoporotic fractures, it is recommended that bone mineral density be measured in all treated coeliac disease patients and those with osteopenia have a repeat intestinal biopsy to assess disease activity.
Osteoporosis in treated adult coeliac disease.
TLDR
Recognised risk factors for osteoporosis in the general population including low body mass index, dietary calcium intake, and early menopause are particularly important in coeliac disease, and treatment with a gluten free diet probably protects against further bone loss.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...