Cahokia$s Boom and Bust in the Context of Climate Change

@article{Benson2009CahokiasBA,
  title={Cahokia\$s Boom and Bust in the Context of Climate Change},
  author={Larry V. Benson and Timothy R. Pauketat and Edward R. Cook},
  journal={American Antiquity},
  year={2009},
  volume={74},
  pages={467 - 483}
}
During the early Mississippian Lohmann phase (A.D. 1050-1100), the American Bottom experienced a political and economic transformation. This transformation included the abrupt planned construction of central Cahokia, a large-scale influx of people to "downtown Cahokia," the abandonment of pre-Mississippian village settlements, the reorganization of farming in the Mississippi River floodplain, and the founding of the Richland farming complex in the Illinois uplands. New tree-ring-based records… Expand
CLIMATE CHANGE AND MIGRATION ALONG A MISSISSIPPIAN PERIPHERY: A FORT ANCIENT EXAMPLE
Archaeologists have long recognized an important relationship between climate change and the trajectory of the Mississippian polity at Cahokia, with twelfth- and thirteenth-century droughts playing aExpand
Cahokia’s emergence and decline coincided with shifts of flood frequency on the Mississippi River
TLDR
Data show that Cahokia emerged during a period of reduced megaflood frequency associated with heightened aridity across midcontinental North America, and that its decline and abandonment followed the return of large floods, concluding that shifts in flood frequency and magnitude facilitated both the formation and the breakdown of Cahokia. Expand
Severe Little Ice Age drought in the midcontinental United States during the Mississippian abandonment of Cahokia
TLDR
A 1600-year-long decadally resolved oxygen isotope (δ18O) record from Horseshoe Lake, an evaporatively influenced oxbow lake that is centrally located within the largest and mostly densely populated series of Mississippian settlements known as Greater Cahokia, indicates that strongly evaporative conditions were persistent during the leadup to Cahokia’s abandonment. Expand
Cahokia: Urbanization, Metabolism, and Collapse
Cahokia in the 12th century A.D. was the largest metropolitan area and the most complex political system in North America north of Mexico. Its metabolism depended on an area of high natural andExpand
After Cahokia: Indigenous Repopulation and Depopulation of the Horseshoe Lake Watershed AD 1400–1900
The occupation history of the Cahokia archaeological complex (ca. AD 1050–1400) has received significant academic attention for decades, but the subsequent repopulation of the region by indigenousExpand
THE MISSISSIPPIAN FIN DE SIÈCLE IN THE MIDDLE CUMBERLAND REGION OF TENNESSEE
Bayesian chronological modeling is used to investigate the chronology for a large-scale human depopulation event during the Mississippian period (AD 1000–1600) known as the Vacant Quarter phenomenon.Expand
A 1600-year record of human impacts on a floodplain lake in the Mississippi River Valley
In North America, land use practices of the last two centuries have strongly influenced aquatic communities and freshwater quality, but the impacts of prehistoric land use on freshwater resourcesExpand
Megadroughts in North America: placing IPCC projections of hydroclimatic change in a long-term palaeoclimate context
IPCC Assessment Report 4 model projections suggest that the subtropical dry zones of the world will both dry and expand poleward in the future due to greenhouse warming. The US Southwest isExpand
MAIZE ADOPTION AND INTENSIFICATION IN THE CENTRAL ILLINOIS RIVER VALLEY: AN ANALYSIS OF ARCHAEOBOTANICAL DATA FROM THE LATE WOODLAND TO EARLY MISSISSIPPIAN PERIODS (A.D. 600–1200)
Abstract We consider the causes and timing of maize (Zea mays) intensification in the central Illinois River valley and argue that an understanding of changes in maize production requires aExpand
The environmental impact of a pre-Columbian city based on geochemical insights from lake sediment cores recovered near Cahokia
Abstract Cahokia is the largest documented urban settlement in the pre-Columbian United States. Archaeological evidence suggests that the city, located near what is now East St. Louis, Illinois,Expand
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